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Cruise Itinerary

Iceland & Ireland Cruise
Celebrity Silhouette Celebrity Cruises 05 September 2020 14 Nights
DayDateArriveDepartPort
15/9/204PM
Southampton offers fast and efficient check-in areas, spacious departure lounges with seating areas, café-bars and smart washrooms. If you wish to travel by car and park for the duration of your cruise, you can pay for and reserve parking in advance directly with the relevant company. Alternatively, if being dropped off or collected by taxi or private car, they can drive right up alongside the terminal building.
26/9/208AM5PMSt Peter Port, Guernsey
37/9/2010AM7PM
Maritime enthusiasts should not miss Cobh: The Queenstown Story, a visitor centre that describes the tale of Ireland’s chief port of entry and departure, which hosted three or four transatlantic liners each week, including of course, White Star Lines’ Titanic. Take in Cork, with its lovely period buildings, and Blarney Castle and the famous Stone. Tour opportunities could also include a visit to the Old Middleton Distillery.
48/9/207AM7PM
In this city, founded in 853 by the Vikings, the attraction is clearly the crystal factory. Follow all stages of production, observing how sand, lead and potash are transformed by fire into sparkling crystal.
59/9/204AM
Tour majestic St. Patrick’s Cathedral, where Jonathan Swift is buried, and stroll through lovely St. Stephen’s Green, a beautiful city park immortalized by James Joyce in Ulysses. The magnificently decorated Book of Kells is on display at the venerable Trinity College. For more secular pursuits, tour the Guinness Storehouse or the Jameson Distillery and learn the secrets to making great Irish beer and whiskey.
610/9/205PM
Tour majestic St. Patrick’s Cathedral, where Jonathan Swift is buried, and stroll through lovely St. Stephen’s Green, a beautiful city park immortalized by James Joyce in Ulysses. The magnificently decorated Book of Kells is on display at the venerable Trinity College. For more secular pursuits, tour the Guinness Storehouse or the Jameson Distillery and learn the secrets to making great Irish beer and whiskey.
711/9/20At Sea
812/9/20At Sea
913/9/207AM4PM
Akureyri is the largest city in Northern Iceland with 16,000 inhabitants. Its location is at the southern end of the 30-mile-long Eyjafjordur, some 60 miles south of the Arctic Circle. A long valley extends southwards from the fjord. This is one of the most fertile agricultural areas of Iceland with many large farms. High mountains on each side of the fjord and valley offer protection from harsh winds. Akureyri became a trading center around 1600. It received a municipal charter in 1862; the population started to grow from that time. The center of town is compact enough to be explored on foot. Here you will find shops, restaurants and even an Internet Café. The main church in Akureyri stands on the hill above the city center. A climb of 112 steps is required to reach the church. The interior is well worth a visit. It features a boat hanging from the ceiling to remind worshippers of their loved ones out at sea. Also of note is a window that was originally in the Coventry Cathedral in England. In the beautiful Botanical Garden you will find plants from as far away as New Zealand, Chile, Tanzania and California, as well as every species native to Iceland. The gardens first opened in 1912. Despite being only 60 miles from the Arctic Circle, Akureyri enjoys some of the warmest weather in the country, with temperatures often reaching the low 70s in summer.
1014/9/2011AM
The fire, frost and water symbolized by the red, white and blue of Iceland's flag are manifested by the ice and snow of its glaciers, the hot mud pools, geysers and glowing lava flows in the country's volcanic regions. The island's settlement dates back to 874 when a Norwegian named Ingolf Arnarson arrived at present-day Reykjavik. In 930, the settlers formed a legislature, the Alting, which was the beginning of the Commonwealth of Iceland. From the 10th to the 14th centuries, Iceland developed a literary form, the Icelandic Saga, which spread throughout the Nordic culture and into the English and German languages. It was used to spin stories of the gods, record historic events and glorify heroes. As Iceland's capital and main center of the country's population, the city of Reykjavik is a fascinating blend of the traditional and modernism. Just as Iceland is a unique country – rugged and remote, yet technically advanced and enjoying Nordic standards of affluence – Reykjavik is a highly unusual capital city. It dominates the life of Iceland in almost every way. More than half of the country's total population of 270,000 is living in and around the capital, and the economy of the entire nation depends on Reykjavik. Nearly 60 percent of Iceland's imports are received and distributed, and 40 percent of the country's exports are loaded for shipment via the port of Reykjavik. It is also the headquarters of what is probably the world's most advanced seafood industry, which counts for Iceland's number one export.
1115/9/203PM
The fire, frost and water symbolized by the red, white and blue of Iceland's flag are manifested by the ice and snow of its glaciers, the hot mud pools, geysers and glowing lava flows in the country's volcanic regions. The island's settlement dates back to 874 when a Norwegian named Ingolf Arnarson arrived at present-day Reykjavik. In 930, the settlers formed a legislature, the Alting, which was the beginning of the Commonwealth of Iceland. From the 10th to the 14th centuries, Iceland developed a literary form, the Icelandic Saga, which spread throughout the Nordic culture and into the English and German languages. It was used to spin stories of the gods, record historic events and glorify heroes. As Iceland's capital and main center of the country's population, the city of Reykjavik is a fascinating blend of the traditional and modernism. Just as Iceland is a unique country – rugged and remote, yet technically advanced and enjoying Nordic standards of affluence – Reykjavik is a highly unusual capital city. It dominates the life of Iceland in almost every way. More than half of the country's total population of 270,000 is living in and around the capital, and the economy of the entire nation depends on Reykjavik. Nearly 60 percent of Iceland's imports are received and distributed, and 40 percent of the country's exports are loaded for shipment via the port of Reykjavik. It is also the headquarters of what is probably the world's most advanced seafood industry, which counts for Iceland's number one export.
1216/9/20At Sea
1317/9/201PM9PM
Belfast is a vibrant exciting city steeped in history with outstanding shops, restaurants and bars. Hillsborough Castle and The Giant’s Causeway in Co. Antrim are prime attractions.
1418/9/20At Sea
1519/9/206AM
Southampton offers fast and efficient check-in areas, spacious departure lounges with seating areas, café-bars and smart washrooms. If you wish to travel by car and park for the duration of your cruise, you can pay for and reserve parking in advance directly with the relevant company. Alternatively, if being dropped off or collected by taxi or private car, they can drive right up alongside the terminal building.
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Call to speak with one of our cruise specialists on 0330 094 0218